Current Artists-In-Residence

Chloe Darke

Metal

Chloe Darke is originally from Groveland, Massachusetts. Her work combines traditional metalsmithing techniques with nontraditional media, including silicone, cultivated fungal colonies, and sound installation. Her pieces, which reference an assortment of instruments and surgical tools of the past, are centered on the activities that take place in a fictional laboratory or examination room. The objects have no specific function and are fantastical, ambiguous, and/or impractical. She looks forward to continuing to explore these ideas in her residency at HCCC, as well as connecting with the greater arts community of Houston.

Darke received her Master of Fine Arts in metalsmithing and jewelry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in May, 2019, and her Bachelor of Fine Arts in metalsmithing and jewelry from Maine College of Art in May, 2011. From 2011 – 2016, she was employed as a silversmith at Old Newbury Crafters in Amesbury, Massachusetts, where she and her coworkers were featured in “Forge,” an episode of the PBS television series, Craft in America. After graduating with her masters, Darke was a lecturer in the Metals and Contemporary Art Jewelry department at the University of Wisconsin-Stout for the 2019-2020 academic year. Currently, she is based in Upperville, Virginia, and is the metals studio assistant at Ayrshire Farm. Her work was recently on display in Contemporary Connections: Mastery in Metal, at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art; Disrupt, at the Craft Council of British Columbia; and Object Permanence, at the Baltimore Jewelry Center. To learn more, visit https://chloedarke.com/home.html.

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Hong Hong

Paper

Hong Hong is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice sits at the intersection of craft, painting, and earthwork. Born in Hefei, China, she immigrated with her mother to North Dakota when she was 10 years old. Hong earned her MFA from University of Georgia in 2014 and her BFA from the State University of New York in 2011. Since then, Hong has traveled across the United States to make site-responsive monumental paper works. In her nomadic practice, traditional processes of Tibetan and Japanese papermaking coalesce with feminist rituals and performances.

Hong’s artwork has been exhibited at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Georgia Museum of Art, Real Art Ways, Penland School of Crafts, Madison Museum of Fine Art, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Jewett Arts Center, and New Mexico History Museum. Hong is the recipient of fellowships and grants from MacDowell, Yaddo, National Endowment for the Arts, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Vermont Studio Center, Center for the Arts at Wesleyan University, and Connecticut Office for the Arts. Her work has been reviewed by Art21, Artnet News, Hyperallergic, Art New England, Hand Papermaking, and Two Coats of Paint.

To learn more about Hong’s work, visit https://www.honghong.studio/.

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Stephanie Robison

Fiber

The sculpture of Stephanie Robison plays with multiple oppositional relationships. Working with industrial fabrics and wood, she creates large-scale installations that examine relationships between culture, nature, and the built environment. Her latest series of work combines traditional stone carving and the process of needle felting wool. By merging incongruous materials such as wool and marble, she works to synthesize and fuse: organic and geometric, natural and architectural, handmade and the uniform industrial. Focusing on materiality and color with this new work, Robison creates charming, often humorous or awkward forms referencing aspects of the body, relationships, and the environment. While in residence at HCCC, Robison plans to expand her current body of work by gaining material knowledge through further exploration into needle felting and stone carving.

Originally from Oregon, Robison currently resides in California, where she teaches sculpture at the City College of San Francisco and serves as educational director for the California Sculptors Symposium. Robison holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Marylhurst University and a Master of Fine Arts in sculpture from the University of Oregon. Her work has been exhibited at Whatcom Museum and Tacoma Art Museum in Washington; Marin Museum of Contemporary Art and Orange County Center for Contemporary Art in California; Peter Robertson Gallery in Alberta, Canada; Yeiser Art Center in Kentucky; and Site:Brooklyn Gallery in New York. To learn more, visit http://www.stephanierobison.com/.

Photo Courtesy of the artist.

Michael Velliquette

Paper

Michael Velliquette constructs stunningly intricate works made from paper. His choice to work with paper is a conscious decision to utilize a humble, everyday material to open a view into imagined worlds. By alluding to fortress-like structures, which are built to withstand force and time, Velliquette highlights the materiality and ephemeral quality of this modest, lightweight material. During his residency at HCCC, Velliquette will be working on a new paper sculpture (which will take about 300-500 hours to complete). He also plans to carry out research and material tests to translate his techniques into metal.

A working artist for 20 years, Velliquette has participated in over 150 exhibitions in museums and galleries in the US, Europe, and Asia. His work is in the permanent collections of the Chazen Museum of Art; the San Antonio Museum of Art; the Art Museum of South Texas; the Racine Art Museum; and The Microsoft Collection. He has participated in numerous residencies and cultural exchange programs, including the Artpace International Artist-in-Residence; the John Michael Kohler Art/Industry program; and EUARCA, Kassel, Germany. Velliquette is a member of the Paper Artist Collective—a global community of artists and designers dedicated to the medium of paper. His work is represented by the David Shelton Gallery in Houston. He is currently a faculty associate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. To learn more, visit https://www.velliquette.com/.

Photo courtesy of the artist.